Anatolian Leopard

Anatolian leopard (Panthera pardus tulliana) is now on the brink of extinction. Leopards are very secretive and elusive animals. For this reason, they are very difficult to locate.

 
Records of leopards in Turkey date back to Neolithic times, when they had a cult status and were artfully depicted siding with the Earth goddess Cybele, or with other gods riding them. Such objects, as well as leopards in murals, steles and reliefs, have been excavated from the 9,000 year old town of Çatalhöyük in Central Turkey.

Anatolian leopard (Panthera pardus tulliana) is now on the brink of extinction. Leopards are very secretive and elusive animals. For this reason, they are very difficult to locate. The species is last recorded in 2013 in Turkey, when a shepherd in Diyarbakır shot a young male leopard. Furthermore, between 2006 and now Doğa gathered various evidences and records of shot animals, which together indicate the regular occurrence of a moderate leopard population in southeast Taurus Mountains.

Doğa carried out community awareness activities in southeast Turkey as part of an SGP project in 2013 and established a volunteers network in the villages within the range of the species and continues to monitor the presence of the species trough this network.

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